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Antifreeze

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Abstract

Water has excellent heat-transfer properties. This and its almost universal availability supports its general use to keep machinery cool by removing excess heat. Disadvantageously, it promotes corrosion and its operating range is curbed by its freezing point of 0°C and boiling point of 100°C, temperatures easily reached in winter conditions or in hot machinery, like internal combustion engines. To abate this problem, chemical antifreezes are added which depress the freezing point of water. For example, a 50% solution by weight of ethylene glycol in water drops the freezing point to −22°C. If the antifreeze chemical alone boils at a higher temperature than water, then it will also raise the boiling point of the mixture and increase the operating range still further.

Keywords

  • Boiling Point
  • Propylene Glycol
  • Freezing Point
  • Internal Combustion Engine
  • Operating Range

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1999 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Fox, M.A. (1999). Antifreeze. In: Glossary for the Worldwide Transportation of Dangerous Goods and Hazardous Materials. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-11890-0_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-11890-0_7

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-662-11892-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-662-11890-0

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive