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Trees IV pp 76-94 | Cite as

Casuarina and Allocasuarina Species

  • E. Duhoux
  • C. Franche
  • D. Bogusz
  • D. Diouf
  • V. Q. Le
  • H. Gherbi
  • B. Sougoufara
  • C. Le Roux
  • Y. Dommergues
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 35)

Abstract

Casuarinas are a group of 96 species of trees and shrubs belonging to the family Casuarinaceae (Wilson and Johnson 1989). The family is unique amongst the angiosperms and, having no close relatives, is assigned to an order of its own, the Casuarinales (Beadle 1981). Casuarinas are morphologically distinctive with the foliage consisting of long needle-like articulate photosynthetic (assimilatory) branchlets. The branchlets have more or less spaced nodes. At each of these is a whorl of 4–20 leaves reduced to teeth (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Frankia Strain Transgenic Root Symbiotic Gene Acacia Mangium Calcium Hypochlorite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Duhoux
    • 1
  • C. Franche
    • 1
  • D. Bogusz
    • 1
  • D. Diouf
    • 1
  • V. Q. Le
    • 1
  • H. Gherbi
    • 1
  • B. Sougoufara
    • 2
  • C. Le Roux
    • 1
  • Y. Dommergues
    • 3
  1. 1.Nogent-sur-MarneFrance
  2. 2.Ministère du Développement rural et de l’HydrauliqueDakarSénégal
  3. 3.11 rue MaccaraniNiceFrance

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