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Iron in Minerals and the Formation of Rust in Stone

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Abstract

The mean iron content of the earth’s crust is 5%. Iron is locked in ferromagnesian silicates in rocks at the earth’s surface mostly as green or black ferrous-ferric iron. The black ferrous-ferric form is magnetite, the red ferric oxide, hematite, and the yellow-brass ferrous sulfides are commonly cubic pyrite and orthorhombic spearhead-shaped marcasite. Iron also appears as white to dark brown ferrous carbonate (siderite) and green iron silicate, glauconite, which adds a greenish color to sedimentary rocks (Sect. 4.4).

Keywords

  • Metallic Iron
  • Iron Mineral
  • Pyrite Oxidation
  • Ferric Hydroxide
  • Stone Surface

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1997 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Winkler, E.M. (1997). Iron in Minerals and the Formation of Rust in Stone. In: Stone in Architecture. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-10070-7_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-10070-7_9

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

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