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Managing breakdowns in international distributed design projects

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Human Behaviour in Design

Abstract

Globalisation has resulted in increased multinational cooperation. To compete in international markets, small and medium-sized manufacturers need to exploit their particular specialisms (e.g., in terms of personnel, knowledge and resources) by making strategic alliances with companies having complementary areas of expertise. By making alliances with designers located in primary international markets, indigenous manufacturers hope to achieve an in-depth understanding of the target market and their requirements. Cross-national alliances offer the potential for mutual benefits, such as sharing information and resources, reducing costs, enlarging markets, etc. In addition, the geographically dispersed team members may be supported by a number of communication infrastructures (e.g., networked, multimedia environments), which can not only reduce lead-time and the cost of product development, but also facilitate collaboration with partners (Siemieniuch and Sinclair 1999).

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© 2003 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Scrivener, S.A., Woodcock, A., Lee, LC. (2003). Managing breakdowns in international distributed design projects. In: Lindemann, U. (eds) Human Behaviour in Design. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-07811-2_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-07811-2_18

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-07366-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-662-07811-2

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