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Dynamic Output Compensation between Selected Channels in Power Systems

  • Serge Lefebvre
Chapter
Part of the Power Systems book series (POWSYS)

Abstract

This chapter proposes a framework for controlling power systems involving two types of control actions: first swing and damping controls. The problem is addressed with control agents having each a specific objective. The agents concur to provide system-wide control. A Wide-Area Measurement System provides the information necessary at each agent using its own representation of the system. First swing controls act as special protection systems in multiple time scales and channels. Damping controls rely on low order dynamic multiple input single output MISO controllers between selected input and output channels at each control agent. The design objectives of damping controls are to mimic the relevant dynamics of linear state feedback. Structural constraints are accounted by a design based on the best measurements available at each agent.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Serge Lefebvre
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut de Recherche d’Hydro-Québec (IREQ)Varennes, QuébecCanada

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