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The Computer, Artificial Intelligence, and the Turing Test

  • B. Jack Copeland
  • Diane Proudfoot
Chapter

Summary

We discuss, first, Turing’s role in the development of the computer; second, the early history of Artificial Intelligence (to 1956); and third, Turing’s famous imitation game, now universally known as the Turing test, which he proposed in cameo form in 1948 and then more fully in 1950 and 1952. Various objections have been raised to Turing’s test: we describe some of the most prominent and explain why, in our view, they fail.

Keywords

Turing Machine National Physical Laboratory Science Museum Logical Design Turing Test 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Jack Copeland
    • 1
  • Diane Proudfoot
    • 1
  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentUniversity of CanterburyNew Zealand

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