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Implementation of a Self-replicating Universal Turing Machine

  • Hector Fabio Restrepo
  • Gianluca Tempesti
  • Daniel Mange
Chapter

Summary

The goal of this contribution is to describe how a universal Turing machine was embedded into a hardware system in order to verify the computational universality of a novel architecture. This implementation was realized with a multicellular automaton inspired by the embryonic development of living organisms. In such an architecture, every artificial “cell” contains a complete copy of the description of the machine, a redundancy that allows the introduction of the properties of self-repair and self-replication. These properties were coupled with a modified version of the W-machine to realize a robust, self-replicating universal computer in actual hardware.

Keywords

Turing Machine Binary Decision Diagram Binary Counter Data Tape Universal Turing Machine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hector Fabio Restrepo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gianluca Tempesti
    • 1
  • Daniel Mange
    • 1
  1. 1.Logic Systems LaboratorySwiss Federal Institute of Technology, LausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Grupo de Percepción y Sistemas Inteligentes, Escuela de Ing. Eléctrica y ElectrónicaUniversidad del ValleCaliColombia

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