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Supply Chain Management and Collaborative Planning

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems book series (LNE, volume 533)

Abstract

This first chapter intends to give an overview of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and an introduction to collaborative planning. In particular, it shall be clarified how collaborative planning relates to SCM and why it can be considered an important component of implementing SCM.

Keywords

Supply Chain Business Process Supply Chain Management Planning Task Collaborative Planning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MainzGermany

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