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Abstract

Nearly all mammals have highly developed olfactory sensory abilities, as well as physiological and behavioral mechanisms for sending, receiving and interpreting olfactory information. Man is clearly one of the least well endowed in these respects. Nevertheless, he has appreciated since early times that this warmblooded and furred brethren have special areas and structures in their skins that emit strong and distinctive odors. The crude secretions of these cutaneous organs, along with other odoriferous materials, were and sometimes still are collected and used by particular peoples for various scent-related purposes, from hunting and trapping food species to attracting the attention of presumptive mates.

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Quay, W.B. (1986). Scent Glands. In: Bereiter-Hahn, J., Matoltsy, A.G., Richards, K.S. (eds) Biology of the Integument. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-00989-5_20

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