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Ecological Modernization – a Paradise of Feasibility but no General Solution

  • Martin JänickeEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Energiepolitik und Klimaschutz. Energy Policy and Climate Protection book series (EPKS)

Abstract

Ecological Modernization (EM) intends to preserve or restore environmental quality by resource-efficient innovation. Today there are several synonyms or similar concepts such as, “eco-innovation”, “green development” “green growth”, or transition towards “green economy” (OECD 2011; UNEP 2011). This environmental policy approach has meanwhile become a well-established strategy and stimulated nothing less than a real Global Industrial Revolution.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Freie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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