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Are Incomplete Advertisements More Effective? A Test of the Generation Effect and the Ambiguity Effect

Part of the European Advertising Academy book series (EAA)

Abstract

During the European Football Championship 2016 in France, Carlsberg promoted its beer only by using the word “probably” with the means of perimeter advertising that looked like the logo of the brand. Neither the brand name nor the product was depicted. The Mars Company sometimes promotes its sweets with ads that only contain a portion of the brand name letters.

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Correspondence to Antonia Kraus .

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Kraus, A., Gierl, H. (2019). Are Incomplete Advertisements More Effective? A Test of the Generation Effect and the Ambiguity Effect. In: Bigne, E., Rosengren, S. (eds) Advances in Advertising Research X. European Advertising Academy. Springer Gabler, Wiesbaden. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-24878-9_8

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