Are Low-Carbon Generation and Competitive Electricity Markets Compatible?

Evidence from the UK Electricity Market Reforms
Chapter

Abstract

The Earth Summit of 1992 in Rio de Janeiro marked the first clear recognition that man-made climate change was a problem that demanded coordinated and substantial action at government level. However, it was not until more than 20 years later that the British government put in place measures that promised to make a significant impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Business SchoolUniversity of GreenwichGreenwichGroßbritannien

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