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The Effects of Consumers’ Subjective Knowledge on Evaluative Extremity and Product Differentiation

  • Andy Wong
Chapter
Part of the EAA Series book series

Abstract

Evaluating and differentiating among product alternatives are fundamental to making an optimal choice (Hoegg and Alba, 2007). To identify the best option out of a choice set, consumers need to tell the differences among available alternatives, setting them apart to an extent that a favorite emerges (Brownstein, 2003; Svenson, 1992). In particular, brand choice often requires identification of the best quality option, or at least ruling out options that are poorer in quality than others.

Keywords

Consumer Research Negative Statement Negative Information Objective Knowledge Sound Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hong Kong Baptist UniversityHong KongChina

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