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The West’s Last War? Neo-Interventionism, Strategic Surprise, and the Waning Appetite for Playing the Away Game

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The Armed Forces: Towards a Post-Interventionist Era?

Abstract

Why maintain armed forces? The question is as fundamental as the answer unambiguous: Because democracies have national and common interests to defend. One current of thought contends that the wars of Iraq and Afghanistan are setting the tone for the sort of future interventions that await the Western military alliance.

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© 2013 Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden

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Leuprecht, C. (2013). The West’s Last War? Neo-Interventionism, Strategic Surprise, and the Waning Appetite for Playing the Away Game. In: Kümmel, G., Giegerich, B. (eds) The Armed Forces: Towards a Post-Interventionist Era?. Schriftenreihe des Zentrums für Militärgeschichte und Sozialwissenschaften der Bundeswehr, vol 14. Springer VS, Wiesbaden. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-01286-1_5

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