Mechanisms of Echolocation

  • J. D. Pye
Part of the Ergebnisse der Biologie / Advances in Biology book series (ERGBIOL, volume 26)

Abstract

The cries of bats, although unperceived by our unaided ears, may be made audible by simple electronic apparatus. With such a detector, it is fascinating to observe a bat navigating, negotiating obstacles and catching its prey in the dusk, and to remember that this performance is achieved by acoustic means. The question always arises “If the bat can do this with two ears and a larynx, why can man achieve only a very imperfect obstacle sense with the same organs ?” The answer is partly that the bat both produces and hears very much higher sound frequencies which permit finer discrimination, and partly that its ear is much more sensitive to short-delay echoes. The physiological mechanisms behind all these effects are of fundamental interest but here only the last aspect will be considered — that of echo detection and interpretation.

Keywords

Radar Hunt Azimuth Tetanus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag OHG. Berlin · Göttingen · Heidelberg 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Pye
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Laryngology and OtologyLondonEngland

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