Trends in Lifelong Learning in Europe

  • Leenamaija Otala
Conference paper

Abstract

The competitiveness of European industry is the key factor to Europe’s future wealth. Industry is the only sector in society generating something that can be transformed into goods and services, into the wealth that society needs. There is a strong link between education and training systems and a country’s level of industrial productivity and competitiveness. The Industrial Research and Development Advisory Committee of the European Commission (IRDAC) has stated: “The output of education and training systems in terms of both quantity and quality of skills at all levels, is the prime determinant of a country’s level of industrial productivity and hence, competitiveness.” The competitiveness of an industry depends more and more on the competence of its workforce (IRDAC 1991). Economists have also calculated that about 40 percent of competitive improvements for business come from the inputs businesses buy, including machines, buildings, and an educated workforce. The other 60 percent come from the way they use the resources they buy. In other words, a nation’s businesses can buy 40 percent of their competitiveness, but the other 60 percent have to be generated from learning (Carnevale 1992).

Keywords

Europe Stake OECD Lester 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leenamaija Otala
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pro Competence Inc.HelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.FrankfurtGermany

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