Evolutionary, Physiological, and Immunological Considerations in Defining a Suitable Donor for Man

  • C. Hammer

Abstract

The dilemma of evolution has been to overcome the conflict between the contradicting requirements, on the one hand, of maintaining what has been achieved and, on the other, of allowing progress. Total constancy of living material would have eliminated any future change of nature, yet unhampered variation would have jeopardized what had already been achieved. The phylogeny of man depends on the possibility of improvement and adaptation from accidental and unplanned mutations.

Keywords

Cholesterol Sugar Hydrate Albumin Carbohydrate 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

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  • C. Hammer

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