The Ten-Minute Presentation

  • M. Evans
  • A. V. Pollock

Abstract

Sir Austin Bradford Hill’s aphorism (1) applies equally to scientific papers and 10-minute presentations: “Why did you start, what did you do, what answer did you get, and what does it mean anyway?” Sir Hugh Casson, past president of the Royal Academy and famous lecturer and after-dinner speaker, indicated the amount of work required when he said during an interview that the secret of his success was that for each minute of speaking he did an hour of preparation.

Keywords

Gall Prep Shoe 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Evans
  • A. V. Pollock

There are no affiliations available

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