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Supportive Care

  • P. J. Moe
Part of the UICC International Union Against Cancer book series (1360)

Abstract

One of the areas of progress in modern medicine has been in producing cures in relatively large numbers of children with disseminated malignant disease. Intensive anticancer therapy, however, generates a host of new problems and often places enormous burdens on the sick child and the child’s family. Fundamental to the treatment of malignant disease in childhood today are not only the drugs that are needed to suppress the growth of neoplastic cells, but also the care which is necessary to prevent mortality and to minimize unpleasant effects of the disease and treatment.

Keywords

Venous Access Platelet Transfusion Morphine Sulphate Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia Granulocyte Transfusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Moe

There are no affiliations available

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