The Economic Evaluation of Advanced Manufacturing Technology

  • P. L. Primrose

Abstract

Companies that have installed Advanced Manufacturing Technology often find that their investment has not been viable. The reasons for this are examined and it is shown that the problem arises because of the way companies evaluate and cost the projects. The nature of the problem is explained and suggestions are made for the solution. The conclusion is drawn that there is nothing wrong with investment appraisal and costing principles, rather the underlying cause is the incorrect application of the principles.

Keywords

Expense Payback 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. L. Primrose
    • 1
  1. 1.Total Technology DepartmentUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and TechnologyManchesterUK

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