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Atherosclerosis and its Risk Factors in the Hawaiian Japanese

  • G. N. Stemmermann
  • G. G. Rhoads
  • W. C. Blackwelder
Conference paper

Abstract

The mortality for coronary heart disease (CHD) among the Japanese of Hawaii is intermediate between the rates for indigenous Japanese and U.S. whites, and indications are that the gap between the Hawaiian Japanese and the Hawaiian Caucasian rates has narrowed (Gordon, 1957; Worth et al., 1975). A tripartite study of Japanese men in Hiroshima, Japan, in Honolulu, Hawaii, and in Northern California (the Ni-Hon-San Study) was undertaken to discover the reason for the upward trend of CHD among the migrant Japanese. Dietary analyses indicate that, in contrast to that of the indigenous Japanese, a larger proportion of the Hawaiian Japanese diet is composed of animal fat and animal protein and a smaller proportion is composed of carbohydrate (CHO). A larger proportion of the Hawaiian CHO load is composed of simple CHO (e.g., sugar), as compared to complex CHO (e.g., rice). The Hawaiian Japanese are heavier, have thicker skinfolds (but are only slightly taller), have higher blood hematocrit levels, have higher levels of serum cholesterol and uric acid, and have more frequent glucose intolerance than the indigenous Japanese (Kagan et al., 1974).

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Uric Acid Coronary Atherosclerosis Uric Acid Level Heart Weight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. N. Stemmermann
  • G. G. Rhoads
  • W. C. Blackwelder

There are no affiliations available

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