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The Asymmetric Carbon Atom Revisited

  • I. Ugi
  • J. Dugundij
  • R. Kopp
  • D. Marquarding
Part of the Lecture Notes in Chemistry book series (LNC, volume 36)

Abstract

In this chapter, we illustrate our general approach to stereochemical problems, and the use of the concepts developed in the previous chapter, by studying the asymmetric carbon atom [1]: we first determine its chemical identity group, and then find that the group is compatible with the usual tetrahedral valence skeleton. It will be pointed out that even in the case of this molecule, which can be represented by a simple geometric model, a purely geometric view of its stereochemical features has inherent logical difficulties, and that these difficulties disappear when the chemical identity viewpoint is adopted.

Keywords

Chemical Identity Asymmetric Carbon Central Carbon Atom Asymmetric Carbon Atom Simple Geometric Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    J. Weyer, Angew. Chem. 86, 604 (1974); Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 13, 591 (1974); see also: K. Mislow and J. Siegel, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. (in press).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J. H. van’t Hoff, “Voorstel tot utbreiding der tegenwoordig in de scheikunde gebruikte struc tur en for mules in de ruimte”, Greven, Utrecht 1874.Google Scholar
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    R. McWeeny, “Symmetry”, Pergamon, London 1962, p. 54.Google Scholar
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    At our institute P. Lemmen and R. Baumgärtner have implemented a computer program for answering just these questions. Some rather interesting results will be published soon.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Ugi
    • 1
  • J. Dugundij
    • 2
  • R. Kopp
    • 1
  • D. Marquarding
    • 1
  1. 1.Organisch-Chemisches InstitutTechnischen Universität MünchenGarchingDeutschland
  2. 2.Department of MathematicsUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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