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Rotovibrational Relaxation Models in Simple Gases

  • Franco Antonio Gianturco
Part of the Lecture Notes in Chemistry book series (LNC, volume 11)

Abstract

In the previous Chapters we analyzed in some detail the ‘forward’ progression of the theoretical treatments that allow one to obtain dynamic observables from first principles. This meant that we had to define an interaction Hamiltonian between colliding partners, compute the corresponding potential forms at various levels of accuracy and then go on to evaluate detailed, state-to-state total and differential cross sections that involved transitions between levels of the rotational and vibrational structures of the colliding partners in their lowest electronic states, usually closed- shell configurations.

Keywords

Potential Energy Surface Potential Surface Pure Mode Multipolar Expansion Vibrational Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Franco Antonio Gianturco
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Physical ChemistryThe University of BariBariItaly
  2. 2.Quantum Chemistry Laboratory(L.C.Q.E.M), C.N.R.PisaItaly

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