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Demonstration Examples

  • Helmut Duddeck
  • Wolfgang Dietrich
  • Gábor Tóth

Abstract

As already mentioned in Chapter 1, NMR spectroscopy has been developed into a highly complex arsenal of instrumentation and methods which are capable of solving even sophisticated structural problems. This, however, makes it difficult to introduce novices to this matter. Relatively simple and easy-to-understand exercise examples do not fully reflect the wealth of experimental possibilities inherent in this method or the information obtainable. On the other hand, more realistic examples may appear to be confusing or nearly impossible to solve, particularly in self-study and even in seminars.

Keywords

Cross Peak Cosy Spectrum Triterpenoid Saponin Spin Network ROESY Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut Duddeck
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Dietrich
    • 2
  • Gábor Tóth
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Organic ChemistryUniversity of HannoverHannoverGermany
  2. 2.Faculty of ChemistryRuhr University BochumBochumGermany
  3. 3.Technical Analytical Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for General and Analytical ChemistryTechnical University BudapestBudapestHungary

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