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Attitudes and Communication

  • Committee on Public Education of the Commission on Cancer Control
Conference paper
Part of the UICC Monograph Series book series (UICC, volume 5)

Abstract

In the first chapters of this work we presented evidence to show that many people react to the idea of cancer in a largely negative and unwarranted manner. This is only one example of what is commonly termed an attitude. Other examples abound: racial prejudice, political and religious attitudes, etc. Before any attempt can be made to change a person’s attitudes, as clear an idea as possible is required of what an attitude consists of. Although there is no unanimity among psychologists on this point, we shall attempt to outline those points on which agreement exists.

Keywords

Social Influence Attitude Change Group Dynamic Cognitive Dissonance Opinion Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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