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The Behaviour of the Individual and Motivation

  • Committee on Public Education of the Commission on Cancer Control
Conference paper
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Part of the UICC Monograph Series book series (UICC, volume 5)

Abstract

This section of the monograph is treated differently from the rest. It has been possible in other sections to prepare either detailed bibliographies of published work on the study of attitudes to cancer, as in chapter 1, which called for no more than an accurate presentation of what facts have so far been uncovered; or to present a guide to some of the accessible and upto-date reviews of research in other disciplines, as in Chapter 5, in which our aim has been to refer readers to authoritative compendia of information rather than to provide a substantial commentary of our own.

Keywords

Danger Signal Cancer Education Cancer Symptom Nebraska Symposium Advanced Book 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1967

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  • Committee on Public Education of the Commission on Cancer Control

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