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Silica and Nitrate Depletion as Related to Rate of Eutrophication in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Superior

  • Claire L. Schelske
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 10)

Abstract

Accelerated eutrophication of lakes caused by inputs of nutrients from man’s activities on land has been recognized for at least 25 years (Hasler, 1947) and has been related to phosphorus and nitrogen loadings (Vollenweider, 1968). Accelerated eutrophication of the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America has been publicized widely from reports about Lake Erie, the most polluted of the lakes (Schelske and Roth, 1973). The two most eutrophic Great Lakes are Erie and Ontario. Hypolimnetic oxygen depletion occurs during the summer in the central basin of Lake Erie (Burns and Ross, 1972). Oxygen depletion also occurs periodically in shallow areas, including the western basin of Lake Erie, Green Bay in Lake Michigan, and Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron, reflecting a high degree of industrialization and land use. Lake Superior is the most oligotrophic lake because its basin is not industrialized and is sparsely populated with few urbanized areas. It is also deepest and largest, with the greatest capacity for dilution of pollutants, including nutrients.

Keywords

Great Lake Nitrate Nitrogen Photic Zone Phytoplankton Assemblage Renewal Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claire L. Schelske

There are no affiliations available

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