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Density of Functioning Cerebral Capillaries in Stroke Patients, Determined by PET

  • A. Gjedde
  • H. Kuwabara
  • L. Berger
  • C. Beil
  • A. C. Evans
  • A. Hakim

Abstract

The regional density of capillaries varies in the brain. This variation is anatomical and does not necessarily reflect a functional coupling of flow, capillary permeability, or cerebral metabolic rate [6]. The variation merely suggests that the total number of capillaries in any one region is a reflection of the normal average energy requirement of the region, and that individual capillaries have similar properties (radius, length, permeability) in different regions. The regional variation does not address the question of how many capillaries are actually functioning at different times, or how this number varies with the energy requirements of individual regions.

Keywords

Capillary Density Cereb Blood Flow Positron Emission Tomograph Oxygen Extraction Fraction Cerebral Metabolic Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Gjedde
    • 1
  • H. Kuwabara
    • 1
  • L. Berger
    • 1
  • C. Beil
    • 1
  • A. C. Evans
    • 1
  • A. Hakim
    • 1
  1. 1.McConnell Brain Imaging UnitMontreal Neurological InstituteMontrealCanada

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