Clinical Implications of Cerebral Blood Flow Studies

  • N. A. Lassen

Abstract

This short review is not confined to summarizing papers presented at the Mainz symposium in 1969. Rather it aims at giving a more general comment on the clinical usefulness of CBF studies and of the various concepts derived from such studies.

Keywords

Permeability Dioxide Respiration Assure Bicarbonate 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. A. Lassen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PhysiologyBispebjerg HospitalCopenhagenDenmark

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