Bony Targets of Non-“skeletal” Hormones

  • G. NicholsJr.
Conference paper

Abstract

Even the most superficial review of the older literature in endocrinology quickly reveals that there was a time when skeletal changes were considered to be among the important features expected in any endocrine disorder. It seemed obvious, for example, that changes in skeletal growth should be a prominent if not central feature of disturbances of pituitary function and growth hormone secretion. Thus, as the effects of other endocrine glands — thyroid, adrenal, gonads — began to be explored it was not surprising that the list of organ systems examined almost always included the skeleton. Thanks to this broad view a considerable number of empiric observations about hormonal effects on bone gradually accumulated (Silberberg and Silberberg, 1956; Asling and Evans, 1956). In some instances this search for skeletal effects was richly rewarded, as in the case of the parathyroids. In others, the effect could only be clearly shown in certain species as for example the marked influence of female sex hormones on avian bone (Kyes, 1934). In still another group — the thyroid and adrenals are good examples — while effects on the skeleton were seen these were far less dramatic than the effects observed in other organs and systems.

Keywords

Lactate Osteoporosis Cortisol Proline Pyruvate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. NicholsJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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