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Silicone Degradation Reactions

  • Conference paper

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY,volume 210)

Abstract

Silicone (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) is generally a very stable polymer. Because of this, it is used in a wide variety of adverse environments such as those with high temperature or as electrical insulation. However, a great deal of this stability derives from the fact that hydrolysis reactions which occur are reversible and the polymer essentially heals itself. It is likely that such reversibility would not occur in the surface region where high concentrations of other components, such as water, can exist. Because of the significant concern about the fate of silicone released from breast implants in particular, it is important to understand the types of chemical changes which may occur in silicone upon exposure to physiological environments so that the data on various silicon-containing species can be correlated with other physiological studies on known compounds. Accordingly, this chapter will focus on the known silicone degradation reactions which occur within normal physiological ranges (37° and mixed aqueous environment). Various other studies will be drawn upon to evaluate the possible changes since the literature on silicone modification under physiological situations is sparse at this time. Three main reactions discussed are hydrolysis, oxidation, and addition.

Keywords

  • Silanol Group
  • Breast Implant
  • Siloxane Bond
  • Surface Silanol Group
  • High Molecular Weight Component

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Chris Batich has worked with attorneys representing women in suits against some manufacturers

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© 1996 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Batich, C., DePalma, D., Marotta, J., Latorre, G. (1996). Silicone Degradation Reactions. In: Potter, M., Rose, N.R. (eds) Immunology of Silicones. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, vol 210. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-85226-8_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-85226-8_2

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-642-85228-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-642-85226-8

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