Advertisement

Macrophage-Silicone Interactions in Women with Breast Prostheses

  • N. S. Hardt
  • J. A. Emery
  • G. LaTorre
  • C. Batich
  • W. E. Winter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 210)

Abstract

In order for silicone from breast implants to have an effect on the immune system, it must be demonstrated that cells with the potential for immune system function have access to silicone. It had long been thought that the fibrous capsule surrounding breast prostheses functioned as an effective barrier between the biomaterial and the host. Implants that ruptured were thought to be innocuous to the host as long as the fibrous tissue capsule surrounding the implant was intact. This was termed “contained rupture.” Thus, the capsule was thought to prevent the egress of foreign material (Bingham et al. 1988)

Keywords

Foreign Material Breast Implant Silicone Breast Implant Capsular Tissue Breast Prosthesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bingham, H.G., Copeland, E.M., Hackett, R. and Caffee, H.H. (1988). Breast cancer in a patient with silicone breast implants after 13 years. Ann Plast Surg 20:236–237.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Caffee HH, Rotatori DS (1993) Intracapsular injection of triamcinolone for prevention of contracture. Plast Reconstr Surg 92:1073–1077PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Emery JA, Spanier SS, Kasnic G, Hardt NS (1994a) The synovial structure of breast implant associated bursae. Mod Pathol 7:728–733.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Emery JA, Hardt NS, Caffee H, Spanier SS (1994b) Breast implant capsules share synovial transporting capabilities. Mod Pathol 7:15AGoogle Scholar
  5. Hardt NS, Yu LT, La Torre G, Steinbach B (1994) Fourier transform infrared microscopy used to identify foreign materials related to breast implants. Mod Pathol 7:669–676.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Hardt NS, Yu LT, La Torre G, Steinbach B (1995) Complications related to retained breast implant capsules. Plast Reconstr Surg 95:364–371PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hausner, R.J., Schoen, F.J., Pierson, K.K. (1978). Foreign body reaction to silicone gel in axillary lymph nodes after augmentation mammaplasty. Plast Reconstr Surg 62:381–384.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Silver R.M., Sahn, E.E., Allen J. A., Sahn, S., Greene, W., Maize, J.C., Garen, P.D. (1993). Demonstration of silicon in sites of connective tissue disease in patients with silicone-gel breast implants. Arch Derm 129:63–68.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Tabatowski K., Elson, CE., Johnston, W.W. (1990). Silicone lymphadenopathy in a patient with a mammary prosthesis. Acta Cytologica 34:10–14.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. S. Hardt
    • 1
  • J. A. Emery
    • 1
  • G. LaTorre
    • 2
  • C. Batich
    • 2
  • W. E. Winter
    • 1
  1. 1.Pathology and Laboratory MedicineUniversity of Florida College of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Materials Science and EngineeringUniversity of Florida College of EngineeringGainesvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations