The Social Costing Debate: Issues and Resolutions

  • Alan J. Krupnick
  • Dallas Burtraw
  • A. Myrick FreemanIII
  • Winston Harrington
  • Karen Palmer
  • Hadi Dowlatabadi
Conference paper

Abstract

This report is meant to provide guidance to PUCs and other parties interested in the social costing debate, although it will also yield useful information to those concerned with improving environmental policy in general.

Keywords

Combustion Dioxide Europe Petroleum Steam 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan J. Krupnick
    • 1
  • Dallas Burtraw
    • 1
  • A. Myrick FreemanIII
    • 1
  • Winston Harrington
    • 2
  • Karen Palmer
    • 2
  • Hadi Dowlatabadi
    • 2
  1. 1.Bowdoin CollegeUSA
  2. 2.Carnegie Mellon UniversityUSA

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