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Protective Barriers in the Nervous System Against Neurotoxic Agents: The Blood-Brain Barrier

  • B. B. Johansson
Part of the Springer Study Edition book series (volume 102)

Abstract

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic interface between blood and the central nervous system (CNS) enabling the brain to keep an optimal internal environment. The current concept of the BBB includes a number of morphological and functional characteristics that restrict or facilitate the passage of substances from blood to brain. Our knowledge of BBB physiology has advanced impressively during the past few decades (Bradbury 1979, 1984; Crone 1987; Pardridge 1983, 1986; Goldstein and Betz 1986). The role of the BBB in neurotoxicology has recently been reviewed by Cremer (1990).

Keywords

Choroid Plexus Brain Endothelial Cell Protective Barrier Organophosphorus Compound Monocarboxylic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

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  • B. B. Johansson

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