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Carcinomas of the Oropharynx Treated with Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 8313

  • K. K. Fu
  • J. D. Cox
  • T. F. Pajak
  • V. A. Marcial
  • L. R. Coia
  • M. Mohiuddin
  • H. M. Selim
  • R. W. Byhardt
  • S. McDonald
  • H. G. Ortiz
  • L. Martin
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 134)

Abstract

Squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx are among the sites within the upper aerodigestive tract most consistently treated with radiation therapy. The ability to observe directly the response to radiation therapy and to document local-regional control and failure result in their being excellent sites to investigate modifiers of radiation effects.

Keywords

Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Severe Late Toxicity Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol Interfraction Interval 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. K. Fu
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. D. Cox
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. F. Pajak
    • 3
  • V. A. Marcial
    • 4
  • L. R. Coia
    • 5
  • M. Mohiuddin
    • 6
  • H. M. Selim
    • 7
  • R. W. Byhardt
    • 8
  • S. McDonald
    • 9
  • H. G. Ortiz
    • 10
  • L. Martin
    • 3
  1. 1.Radiation Oncology L-08University of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Radiation Therapy Oncology Group HeadquartersAmerican College of RadiologyPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Radiation Oncology CenterSan JuanUSA
  5. 5.Fox Chase Cancer CenterPhiladelphiaUSA
  6. 6.Department of Rad Ther-Bodine CenterThomas Jefferson University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Radiation TherapyThe Methodist HospitalBrooklynUSA
  8. 8.Department of Radiologic TherapyZablocki V.A. HospitalMilwaukeeUSA
  9. 9.Department of Radiation OncologyUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA
  10. 10.Department of Radiological SciencesPuerto Rico Cancer CenterSan JuanUSA

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