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Invasive Aspergillosis: Host Defenses

  • R. D. Diamond
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 132)

Abstract

Though species of Aspergillus are among the most common fungi in the environment, invasive aspergillosis is extremely rare in immunocompetent individuals. The small conidia of these ubiquitous organisms are inhaled frequently. However, progressive infections ensue only if conditions permit these conidia to survive, shed their outermost coatings of hydrophobic rodlet-like structures, then swell and ultimately germinate, and grow as potentially pathogenic mycelia. Thus, host defense mechanisms can prevent invasive aspergillosis by killing or blocking the transition and growth of any one of these sequential phases in morphogenesis (Levitz and Diamond 1984; Rinaldi 1983; Waldorf 1986; Schaffner et al. 1982).

Keywords

Invasive Aspergillosis Aspergillus Fumigatus Chronic Granulomatous Disease Fungicidal Activity Pulmonary Invasive Aspergillosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Levitz SM, Diamond RD (1984) Changing patterns of aspergillosis infections. In: Stollerman GH, Harrington WJ, Lamont JT, Leonard JF, Siperstein MD (eds) Advances in internal medicine, vol 30. Yearbook Medical, Chicago, pp 153–174 General review of clinical aspects of aspergillosis with careful definitions and categorization of infectious and allergic syndromes.Google Scholar
  2. Rinaldi MG (1983) Invasive aspergillosis. Rev Infect Dis 5:1066–1077 General review of clinical aspects of aspergillosis including excellent summary of mycological aspects.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Waldorf AR (1986) Host-parasite relationship in opportunistic mycoses. Crit Rev Microbiol 13:133–172 General review of experimental pathogenesis of aspergillosis.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Diamond
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Section of Infectious DiseasesThe University HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Evans Department of Clinical ResearchBoston University Medical CenterBostonUSA

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