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Structure and Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

  • William A. Catterall
  • Todd Scheuer
  • Randal Numann
  • Ming Li
  • James West
  • Brian Murphy
  • Sandra Rossie
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 60)

Abstract

The depolarizing phase of the action potential in most excitable cells results from an initial increase in sodium permeability mediated by voltage-gated sodium channels followed by a more prolonged increase in calcium permeability mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels. Repolarization is then caused by activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. Calcium entering the cell during the action potential serves as an intracellular messenger to initiate secretion, contraction, and metabolic and regulatory events. The voltage-gated ion channels are also subject to regulation by interaction with G proteins and by protein phosphorylation stimulated by intracellular second messengers. This form of ion channel modulation has been reported for many calcium channels and potassium channels, but has been described less frequently for sodium channels. In this brief chapter, we have reviewed research from our laboratory which has given new insight into the molecular properties of sodium channels and the molecular basis oftheir modulation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C.

Keywords

Sodium Channel Complex Of320 Channel Inactivation Scorpion Toxin Sodium Channel Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. Catterall
    • 1
  • Todd Scheuer
    • 1
  • Randal Numann
    • 1
  • Ming Li
    • 1
  • James West
    • 1
  • Brian Murphy
    • 1
  • Sandra Rossie
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, SJ-30University of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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