Directed Movement in the Frog: A Closer Look at a Central Representation of Spatial Location

  • Paul Grobstein
Part of the Research Notes in Neural Computing book series (NEURALCOMPUTING, volume 3)

Abstract

The neuronal circuitry underlying directed, ballistic movements in the frog includes a stage in which information about target location is represented in a form which is both experimentally distinguishable from spatial representations closer to the sensory and motor sides of the nervous system, and distinctive in its organization. Three dimensional location is represented in a distributed fashion, in terms of independent orthogonal components Each component appears to be population coded, apparently as the total activity in a particular neuronal structure. These findings are discussed in relation to related findings in other systems, with the objectives of identifying possible generalizations about spatial representations involved in sensorimotor processing and of defining directions for future research based on these.

Keywords

Retina Fractionation Neurol Stein Active Element 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Grobstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyBryn Mawr CollegeBryn MawrUSA

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