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Cross-Correlation Analyses of Motoneuron Inputs in a Coordinated Motor Act

  • P. A. Kirkwood
  • T. A. Sears
Part of the Springer Series in Synergetics book series (SSSYN, volume 49)

Abstract

The neuronal co-operativity of active movements occurs at several levels. At the first level most movements involve the coordinated action of several muscles. For instance in mammalian respiratory movements, the subject of this chapter, diaphragm contractions are assisted by activation of inspiratory intercostal muscles. This assistance is needed not only to produce expansion of the thorax but to prevent its collapse, which the negative intra-thoracic pressure could otherwise produce. At the second level, within a given muscle several motoneurons are usually coactivated and are recruited in a stereotyped sequence corresponding to the appropriate level of control at different force levels. Finally, for a given motoneuron, many inputs must cooperate to produce a discharge.

Keywords

Intercostal Nerve Common Input Correlation Kernel Motor Unit Discharge Muscle Spindle Afferents 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Kirkwood
    • 1
  • T. A. Sears
    • 1
  1. 1.Sobell Department of NeurophysiologyInstitute of NeurologyLondonEngland

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