Advances in the Technology of Continuous Infusion

  • Jose R. Marti
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

Since medicine demonstrated that chemotherapy could have an impact on the outcome of cancer, man has tried to improve on the techniques of delivery. Advances have been made, based on innovative concepts of applied anatomy and on an improved understanding of cell biology, but also based on pure technological progress at the mechanical level. In fact, continuous infusion of chemotherapy is just one of several techniques that reflect the level of multi-disciplinary approach available for the management of malignant disorders today. The basic requirements for establishing such a system consist of a large bore vein, a catheter with an entry site, and a mechanical device providing a constant flow. The technological advances, as well as their advantages over the traditional techniques, are reviewed below. The pitfalls and potential complications will also be briefly analyzed.

Keywords

Obesity Titanium Toxicity Catheter Rubber 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jose R. Marti
    • 1
  1. 1.The Brooklyn HospitalBrooklynUSA

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