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Identification of Occupational Cancer Risks Using a Population-Based Cancer Registry

  • P. R. Band
  • J. J. Spinelli
  • R. P. Gallagher
  • W. J. Threlfall
  • V. T. Y. Ng
  • J. Moody
  • D. Raynor
  • L. M. Svirchev
  • D. Kan
  • M. Wong
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 120)

Abstract

Population-based cancer registries provide a unique opportunity for epidemiologic research aimed at identifying occupational cancer risks. However, this potential has been underutilized due to insufficient information on occupation and industry or data on important confounders such as cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and socio-economic status (McCrea Curnen et al. 1984). Due to these limitations, occupational studies using population-based cancer registries for case ascertainment have generally focussed on studies of occupational risks associated with a single tumor site (Jarvisalo et al. 1984; McLaughlin et al. 1987; Pearce et al. 1986a,b), and have rarely encompassed the broad spectrum of human malignancies with the possibility to control for confounding variables (Williams et al. 1977).

Keywords

Lung Cancer Organic Extract Lung Cancer Mortality Combustion Emission Coke Oven Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin·Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. R. Band
    • 1
  • J. J. Spinelli
    • 1
  • R. P. Gallagher
    • 1
  • W. J. Threlfall
    • 1
  • V. T. Y. Ng
    • 1
  • J. Moody
    • 1
  • D. Raynor
    • 1
  • L. M. Svirchev
    • 1
  • D. Kan
    • 1
  • M. Wong
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Epidemiology, Biometry and Occupational OncologyCancer Control Agency of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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