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The Typical Reed-Sternberg Phenotype and I g Gene Rearrangement of Hodgkin’s Disease Derived Cell Line ZO Indicating a B-Cell Origin

  • S. Poppema
  • L. Visser
  • B. de Jong
  • M. Brinker
  • J. Atmosoerodjo
  • W. Timens
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 117)

Abstract

Hodgkin’s disease differs from non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas by the presence of reactive lymphocytes, histiocytes, plasma cells, fibroblasts, and eosinophils in addition to the abnormal, so-called Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants. Usually, Reed-Sternberg cells constitute only a minor population, whereas there is a majority of small reactive lymphocytes. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas have been demonstrated by immunological or gene analysis approaches to be monoclonal populations of B- or T-lymphocyte-derived cells. In Hodgkin’s disease neither the cell of origin nor the monoclonal origin of Reed-Sternberg cells has been established. One approach to analyze the origin and nature of Reed-Sternberg cells is the establishment of cell lines derived from tissues or fluids involved in Hodgkin’s disease. Ideally, one should be able to demonstrate identical membrane and cytoplasmic markers, chromosomal abnormalities, and gene rearrangements in Reed-Sternberg cells in tissue sections and in the in vitro counterparts. Here we will describe the establishment and characterization of cell line ZO, derived from a pericardial effusion in a patient with the nodular sclerosis type of Hodgkin’s disease. In addition we will describe the preparation of three new antibodies against this cell line and report their staining patterns and those of other anti-Reed-Sternberg cell reagents on Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s cell lines and Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas.

Keywords

Gene Rearrangement Pericardial Fluid Nodular Sclerosis Freeze Tissue Section Normal Lymphoid Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Poppema
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Visser
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. de Jong
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Brinker
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Atmosoerodjo
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Timens
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Laboratory MedicineCross Cancer InstituteEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Departments of Pathology and Human GeneticsUniversity of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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