Bone Marrow Transplantation in the Treatment of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Problems, Remaining Challenges, and Future Prospects

  • J. O. Armitage
  • M. J. Barnett
  • A. M. Carella
  • K. A. Dicke
  • V. Diehl
  • J. G. Gribben
  • M. Pfreundschuh
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 117)

Abstract

Table 1 summarizes the results of autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) in more than 200 patients. The results seem to be rather consistent between the groups who have the largest published series of ABMT in Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These results can be summarized as follows: about half of the patients not responding to primary induction chemotherapy or refractory to two or more chemotherapy regimens can obtain complete remission by high-dose chemotherapy and ABMT, and about half of the complete responders can be expected to remain in long-term disease-free survival. Even though toxicity and morbidity of this aggressive procedure are high, the death rate is about 10%. Thus, there is no doubt that high-dose chemotherapy with ABMT is an established approach in certain patients with Hodgkin’s disease. However, as this approach is very toxic, several questions arise: what are the characteristics of patients with Hodgkin’s disease who are likely to profit from this approach; which is the optimal high-dose myeloablative regimen; which is the optimal source of stem cells for hematopoietic reconstitution; is there any value in bone marrow purging; how can toxicity be reduced; and what are the future prospects of ABMT in Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Keywords

Toxicity Lymphoma Leukemia Oncol Sarcoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. O. Armitage
    • 1
  • M. J. Barnett
    • 1
  • A. M. Carella
    • 1
  • K. A. Dicke
    • 1
  • V. Diehl
    • 1
  • J. G. Gribben
    • 1
  • M. Pfreundschuh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA

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