A Public Choice Analysis of Strategies for Restoring International Economic Stability

  • Thomas D. Willett
Part of the Studies in International Economics and Institutions book series (INTERN.ECONOM.)

Abstract

By almost any measure the world economy over the past decade and a half has been disappointing. Thus the current concerns with the possible need for major reforms in our international institutional arrangements are quite understandable. However, it is argued in this paper that proposals for such reforms frequently are seriously defective because their authors have failed to consider adequately the types of political considerations emphasized in public choice analysis.

Keywords

Income Assure Volatility Rium Poss 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

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  • Thomas D. Willett

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