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Neurotoxic Effects of Lysolecithin, Mouse, Rat

  • Susan M. Hall
Part of the Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animals book series (LABORATORY)

Abstract

Experimental lesions are produced by the injection of varying amounts of lysolecithin directly into the central nervous system or peripheral nerves. The sites and techniques of injection will be described in following sections of this report. Gross lesions are not usually observed.

Synonyms

Lysolecithin lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan M. Hall

There are no affiliations available

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