Advertisement

Inactivation of HIV and Safety Precautions for the Workplace

  • B. R. Saltzman
  • A. E. Friedman-Kien
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 112)

Abstract

In June 1981 the initial reports of the occurrences of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and Kaposi’s sarcoma in previously healthy homosexual men [1, 2] heralded the beginning of the epidemic now known as the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Shortly thereafter it was recognized that the particular populations found to be at risk for the development of AIDS — homosexual or bisexual men, intravenous drug users, hemophiliacs, and people who have received blood transfusions or other blood products — were also known to be at risk for infection with hepatitis B (HBV).

Keywords

Health Care Worker Safety Precaution Disposable Glove Infection Control Guideline Alcohol Isopropyl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Gottlieb MS, Schroff R, Schanker HM et al. (1981) Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and mucosal candidiasis in previously healthy homosexual men: evidence of a new acquired cellular immunodeficiency. N Engl J Med 305:1425PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Friedman-Kien AE, Laubenstein L, Marmor M et al. (1981) Kaposi’s sarcoma and Pneumocystis pneumonia among homosexual men – New York and California. MMWR 30: 250–252Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Barre-Sinoussi F, Chermann JC, Rey F et al. (1983) Isolation of a T-lymphotropic retrovirus from a patient at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Science 220:868–871PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Popovic M, Sarngadharan MG, Read E, Gallo RC (1984) Detection, isolation and continuous production of cytopathic retroviruses (HTLV-III) from patients with AIDS and pre-AIDS. Science 224: 497–500PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Centers for Disease Control (1987) Recommendations for prevention of HIV transmission in health-care settings. MMWR 35 [Suppl 2S]: 3–18Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ward JW, Deppe DA, Samson S et al. (1987) Risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection from blood donors who later developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Ann Intern Med 106: 61–62PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Curran JW, Morgan MM, Hardy AM et al. (1985) The epidemiology of AIDS: current status and future prospects. Science 229: 1352–1357PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Friedland CH, Klein RS (1987) Transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus. N Engl J Med 317:1125–1135PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Martin LS, McDougal JS, Loskoski SL (1985) Disinfection and inactivation of the human T lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus. J Infect Dis 152: 400–403PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Spire B, Barre-Sinoussi F, Montagnier L, Chermann JC (1984) Inactivation of lymphadenopathy associated virus by chemical disinfectants. Lancet: 899–901Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Resnick L, Veren K, Salahuddin SZ, Tondreau S, Markham PD (1986) Stability and inactivation of HTLV-III/LAV under clinical and laboratory environments. JAMA 255: 1887–1891PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Martin LS, Loskoski SL, McDougal JS (1987) Inactivation of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus by formaldehyde-based reagents. Appl Environ Microbiol 53: 708–709PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Kaplan JC, Crawford DC, Durno AG, Schooley RT (1987) Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus by betadine. Infect Control 8: 412–414PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hicks DR, Martin LS, Gretchell JP et al. (1985) Inactivation of HTLV-III/LAV-infected cultures of normal human lymphocytes by nonoxynol-9 in vitro. Lancet ii: 1422CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Klein RJ, Buimovici-Klein E, Ong KR, Czelusniak SM, Lange M, Friedman-Kien AE (1987) Inactivation of human immunodeficiency, herpes simplex, and vaccinia viruses by sodium oxychlorosene. Lancet ii: 281–282CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Prince AM, Horowitz B, Brotman B (1986) Sterilisation of hepatitis and HTLV-III viruses by exposure to Tri(n-BUTYL)phosphate and sodium cholate. Lancet 706-710Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Centers for Disease Control (1985) Recommendations for preventing transmission of infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus in the workplace. MMWR 34: 681–686, 691-695Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    McCray E (1986) The Cooperative needlestick surveillance group. Occupational risk of the acquired immunedeficiency syndrome among health-care workers. N Engl J Med 314:1127–1132PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Henderson DK, Saah AJ, Zak BJ, Kaslow RA, Lane C et al. (1986) Risk of nosocomial infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus in a large cohort of intensively exposed health care workers. Ann Intern Med 104: 644–647PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Gerberding JL, Bryant-LeBlanc CE, Nelson K, Moss AR, Osmond D et al. (1987) Risk of transmitting the human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis B virus to health care workers exposed to patients with AIDS and AIDS-related conditions. J Infect Dis 156:1–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    McEvoy M, Porter K, Mortimer P, Simmons N, Shanson D (1987) Prospective study of clinical, laboratory, and ancillary staff with accidental exposures to blood or other body fluids from patients infected with HIV. Br Med J [Clin Res] 294:1595–1597CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Klein RS, Phelan A, Freeman K et al. (1987) Low occupational risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection among dental professionals. N Engl J Med 318: 86–90CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Anonymous (1984) Needlestick transmission of HTLV-III from a patient infected in Africa. Lancet: 1376-1377Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Oksenhendler E, Harzie M, Le Roux JM, Rabian C, Clauvel JP (1986) HIV infection with seroconversion after a superficial needlestick injury to the finger. N Engl J Med 515: 582Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Neisson-Vernant C, Arfi S, Mathez D, Leibowitch J, Monplaisir N (1986) Needlestick HIV seroconversion in a nurse. Lancet 2: 814PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Centers for Disease Control (1987) Update: human immunodeficiency virus infections in health care workers exposed to blood of infected patients. MMWR 36: 285–289Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Centers for Disease Control (1986) Apparent transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus from a child to a mother providing health care. MMWR 35: 76–79Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Grint P, McEvoy M (1985) Two associated cases of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PHLS Commun Dis Rep 42: 4Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Weiss SH, Goedert JJ, Gartner S et al. (1988) Risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection among laboratory workers. Science 239: 68–71PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Hessol NA, Rutherford GW, O’Malley PM et al. (1987) The natural history of human immunodeficiency virus infection in a cohort of homosexual and bisexual men (Abstract). In: Abstracts from the III international conference on AIDS, June 1-5, 1987, Washington, DC, p 1Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Centers for Disease Control (1986) Recommended infection-control practices for dentistry. MMWR 35: 237–242Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Centers for disease control (1986) Recommendations for providing dialysis treatment to patients infected with Human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus. MMWR 35: 376–383Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Centers for disease control (1986) Human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus: agent summary statement. MMWR 35: 540–549Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Centers for disease control (1986) Recommendations for preventing transmission of infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus during invasive procedures. MMWR 35: 221–223Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Saltzman
    • 1
  • A. E. Friedman-Kien
    • 1
  1. 1.Kaplan Cancer Center, Department of MedicineNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations