Fibrin Sealant in Burn Injuries — Experimental Study

  • G. Blümel
  • R. Ascherl
  • S. Haas
  • K. Geißdörfer
  • A. Stemberger
  • G. Schäfer
  • W. Erhardt
  • O. Petrowicz
Conference paper

Abstract

Fibrin sealant was investigated in experimentally induced local burn wounds. Application of fibrin sealant onto postexcision wounds by a spray apparatus yielded both good epithelialization and wound closure. In combination with various skin grafts (mesh graft, split thickness graft, and free flaps) the fibrin sealant reduced the risk of graft failure.

The clinical significance of burn injuries is highlighted by the following figures: 300 000 of the 2 000 000 people who sustain burn injuries per year in the USA require hospitalization.

Due to the size and degree of their burn injury 20000 individuals are referred to centers specializing in burn treatment, and 12 000 patients die as a direct result of their burn injury [6].

When a burn wound exceeds 40% of the body surface area, mortality increases disproportionately. Children and elderly patients are affected most severely.

Key words

Fibrin sealant burn injuries skin grafts 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Blümel
  • R. Ascherl
  • S. Haas
  • K. Geißdörfer
  • A. Stemberger
  • G. Schäfer
  • W. Erhardt
  • O. Petrowicz

There are no affiliations available

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