The Approach

  • G. van Straten
  • L. Somlyódy
Conference paper

Abstract

In Chapter 1 we introduced the lake eutrophication problem and briefly outlined the many aspects that may play a role in the search for solutions. Obviously, the approach must cope with the characteristics of the problem, such as complexity, interdisciplinarity, and uncertainty. In addition, the approach must overcome the constant conflict between the need for scientific thoroughness and understanding, and the necessity to extract and provide information that can be employed at the policymaking level. Thus, the scientific problem arises as to how to interrelate and integrate system processes that essentially differ on temporal and spatial scales such that the final result not only provides insights, but can also be used as a tool for decision making. This is the theme of this chapter.

Keywords

Chlorophyll Photosynthesis Sewage Expense Settling 

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Copyright information

© International Institute for Applied Analysis, Laxenburg/Austria 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. van Straten
  • L. Somlyódy

There are no affiliations available

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