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Human Tumour Immunobiology

  • S. Monfardini
  • K. Brunner
  • D. Crowther
  • S. Eckhardt
  • D. Olive
  • S. Tanneberger
  • A. Veronesi
  • J. M. A. Whitehouse
  • R. Wittes
Part of the UICC International Union Against Cancer book series (UICCI)

Abstract

Tumour cells in man must be immunologically “different” from normal cells and the human immune system must be able to “recognize” this difference. It has been demonstrated that:
  1. 1.

    Human tumour cells possess tumour-associated antigens (TAA) not present in normal tissues.

     
  2. 2.

    Mononuclear cells from patients bearing tumours are capable of destroying autologous tumour cells in in vitro experiments.

     
  3. 3.

    Plasma or serum from the tumour-bearing patient blocks the ability of that patient’s mononuclear cells to destroy autologous tumour cells.

     

Keywords

Multiple Myeloma Autologous Tumour Cell Human Leukocyte Interferon Specific Immune Activity Thymosin Fraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Gale RP (1980) Autologous bonemarrow transplantations in patients with cancer. J Am Med Assoc 236:540–542CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hersch EM, Mavligit GM, Gutterman JU (1976) J Am Med Assoc 236:1739–1742CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lobuglio AF (1980) Clinical Immunotherapy. Marcel Dekker, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. MacDonald JS (1976) The immunobiology of colorectal cancer. Semin Oncol 3:421–432Google Scholar
  5. Oettgen HF (1977) Immunotherapy of cancer. N Engl J Med 297:484–491PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Sikora K (1980) Does interferon cure cancer? Brit Med J 281:855–858PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Stevenson GT, Laurence DJR (1975) The Immune Response to Human Tumours in Man. UICC Technical Report Series, Vol 22. UICC, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  8. Terry WD, Windhorst D (Eds). (1978) Immunotherapy of Cancer: Present Status of Trials in Man. Raven Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. Waldmann TA, et al. (1978) Disorders of suppressor immunoregulatory cells in the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Ann Intern Med 88:226–235PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Monfardini
    • 1
  • K. Brunner
    • 2
  • D. Crowther
    • 3
  • S. Eckhardt
    • 4
  • D. Olive
    • 5
  • S. Tanneberger
    • 6
  • A. Veronesi
    • 1
  • J. M. A. Whitehouse
    • 7
  • R. Wittes
    • 8
  1. 1.Centro Riferimento OncologicoAviano (Pordenone)Italy
  2. 2.Onkologie-AbteilungInselspitalBernSwitzerland
  3. 3.Manchester University and Christie Hospital and Holt Radium InstituteManchesterUK
  4. 4.National Institute of OncologyBudapestHungary
  5. 5.Service de Médécine Infantille IIHopital d’Enfants Allée du MorovanVandoeuvre-Les-NancyFrance
  6. 6.Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDRRobert-Roessle-InstitutBerlin-BuchG.D.R.
  7. 7.CRC Medical Oncology Unit, Centre Block CF99Southampton General HospitalSouthamptonUK
  8. 8.Division of Cancer Treatment, Dept. of Health, Education and WelfareNational Institute of HealthBethesdaUSA

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