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The Biological Importance of Adequate Oxygen Supply: On-line Measurement of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide

  • W. Erdmann
  • N. S. Faithfull
  • A. Trouwborst
  • W. Rating
  • R. M. Schepp
  • R. Droh

Abstract

Without adequate oxygen supply human life is impaired. Of central consideration is the cell, whose oxygen supply occurs by diffusion from the extracellular space into the intracellular space. Oxygen consumption in the cell results in the production of energy and release of CO2, which then diffuses out of the cell into the extracellular space. While intracellular PO2 is maintained fairly constant below l0mm Hg and PCO2 below 47 mm Hg, extracellular partial pressures show a wide range of values dependent on the geometric position of the cell in question - in relation to the supplying capillary mesh work. The intracellular gas tensions are maintained at a constant value by changes of the diffusion properties of the cell membrane (Fig. 1). It is not known what the partial pressures are in the nucleus of the cell and current knowledge focuses on the cell in its entirety.

Keywords

Oxygen Supply Tissue Perfusion Glyoxylic Acid Hydroxybutyric Acid Oxygen Diffusion Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Erdmann
  • N. S. Faithfull
  • A. Trouwborst
  • W. Rating
  • R. M. Schepp
  • R. Droh

There are no affiliations available

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